Passion…Heartbreak…Art

Photo 1931
Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo

"Henry Ford Hospital," 1932
Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo, born in Mexico, 1907, was severely injured in a streetcar accident nearly severing her spine. Confined to her bed for many months, she began painting while lying on her back. Chronic pain stayed with her throughout her life.

Frida, 22, petite and beautiful, married Mexico’s most well known artist, Diego Rivera, 42, voluminous and reportedly resembling a frog . Passionately in love, they lived in a bright blue house and joined the Mexican Communist party.

Shortly after the marriage, Diego, although deeply in love with Frida, but chronically unfaithful, began affairs with other women. Frida suffered two miscarriages and produced her graphic/symbolic masterpiece paintings of emotional and physical pain… paintings that exalt the ability of women to endure truth, reality, cruelty and suffering. They are heartbreaking.

Frida’s fame grew, culminating in the purchase in 1939 of one of her portraits by the Louvre, Paris. Frida was the first Mexican woman artist to be represented in a major European institution.

Frida died at 47 in 1954.

Diego Rivera…”This day is the most tragic day of my life. I have lost my beloved Frida forever. Too late now, I realize that the most wonderful part of my life has been my love for Frida.”

Frida Kahlo…”I suffered two grave accidents in my life. One was when a streetcar knocked me down. The other was Diego.”

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2012-03-06T19:05:13+00:00

14 Comments

  1. Philip Wells March 6, 2012 at 7:32 pm - Reply

    What have you got on Salvador Dali?

    • kkeditor March 6, 2012 at 7:51 pm - Reply

      Thx for the tip. I’ll work on it. Dali is fertile ground!

  2. Donna Turner March 6, 2012 at 8:11 pm - Reply

    I think it is very interesting how the tragedy of miscarriage stimulates art. Although I hardly ever write poetry, I wrote a poem in response to my close friend’s miscarriage. I gave it to her as a way of showing my solidarity with her experience.

    This is a very sad painting, but expresses her experience in a way that helps others relate.

    Yes, he does sort of look like a frog!

    • kkeditor March 7, 2012 at 5:51 am - Reply

      Yes, it is a sad, hard hitting painting and spares us nothing.

  3. Sandy Bornstein March 7, 2012 at 1:43 am - Reply

    Very interesting and so very sad! I love your blog.
    Thanks, Kirby!
    Sandy

    • kkeditor March 7, 2012 at 5:40 am - Reply

      yes, so very very sad. But Frida had an indomitable spirit! A few years before she died, due to very poor circulation in her right foot, she had to have it amputated. Her response was, “Feet, why do I need them when I have wings to fly!” K

  4. dede schuhmacher March 7, 2012 at 2:47 am - Reply

    How do you describe enduring passion two people have for each other. Passion can be cruel, exhilarating, and add greatly to creativity. It is said suffering is a part of a true artist, because they have delved deeper into life. The work of Frida and Diego show true passion and suffering.

  5. Vic DePratti March 7, 2012 at 3:02 am - Reply

    Kirby. I love your description of the relationship of Kahlo and Rivera… a marriage made in the nether world. Kahlo paintings invite interest, passion, and envolvment. Brilliant color mixed with multiple self portraits. Brilliance mixed with tradgedy. She left her mark, timeless and lingering.

    • kkeditor March 7, 2012 at 5:47 am - Reply

      netherworld….a synonym for underworld or horror. The marriage did seem to be that, but I don’t think either Frida or Diego intended it to be so.

  6. Diane Rudy March 7, 2012 at 1:33 pm - Reply

    Once again, you present to us, a nugget of beauty and emotional content! Frida Kahlo’s painting is tears at our hearts. Your writing brings home the essence of her story.
    Thanks,
    Kirby

  7. Diane Rudy March 7, 2012 at 1:43 pm - Reply

    Once again, you present to us a nugget of beauty and emotional content! Frida Kahlo’s painting tears at our hearts. Your writing brings home the essence of her story. Passion, pain, joy, suffering, the story of humanity
    Thank you, Kirby!

  8. Patrica Thanas March 23, 2012 at 1:37 am - Reply

    I am impressed with this internet site , real I am a fan .

  9. Timothy Homsher April 5, 2012 at 2:41 am - Reply

    You are my intake, I have few blogs and infrequently run out from brand :). “To die for a religion is easier than to live it absolutely.” by Jorge Luis Borges.

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